Bald Eagle Egg #3, Day 1

The Fort St. Vrain Bald Eagles have been busy. They’ve added more sticks to their nest…

Male brings another stick to the nest — this seems to be an ongoing remodeling project, kinda like our bathroom renovation.

… they are eating well…

… and as of this morning, they’ve laid a third egg.

If I’ve counted correctly, we should start seeing eaglets around March 20.

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Bald Eagle Egg #2 Day 1

The Fort St. Vrain Bald Eagles fussed about their nest again today. Those sticks just aren’t quite right!

The eagle in the foreground stood up when the smaller eagle in the background flew in. The smaller eagle is fussing with the sticks that make up the nest. Photo courtesy Excel Bird Cam.
Moving the stick. Photo courtesy Excel Bird Cam.

The larger eagle, in the foreground, flew off, and left us with a view of the smaller eagle — and two eggs.

Eagle with two eggs, as of sometime today. Photo courtesy Excel Bird Cam.

Of concern: snow and single digit night time temperatures for the next few days…

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Bald Eagle Egg #1, Day 1

The Bald Eagles at the St. Vrain Power Plant in Platteville, Colorado laid their first egg of the season sometime last night or early this morning.

When I checked in on them around 10:00 this morning, one of the eagles was sitting in the depression they had carefully created in the nest.https://amylaw.blog/2019/02/10/eagle-cam/

This eagle is exhibiting typical brooding behavior — sitting in one spot for long periods of time.

I wasn’t sure she had an egg there, but she didn’t move for a very long time.

Just as I was getting ready actually get to my work, the eagle stood up. I was able see the egg just to the side of her tail.

Newly laid bald eagle egg to the left of eagle’s tail.

Moments after she stood up, the other eagle returned, with a branch in it’s beak.

The stick needed to be placed in just the right place.

I was surprised at how much they dragged that stick around, and that they didn’t hit the egg.

Excel has two cameras on the eagle nest at St. Vrain. The rest of these images are from a different perspective, because I switched to the other camera.

The stick was repositioned several times, and some of the branches trimmed with a quick snip of the beak. Finally, it was in a good spot.

Stick is in the right place

The eagles touched beaks, and one, presumably the male took off. I have no idea if the beak-touching is a frequent thing, or was just for Valentines Day. Sorry. A little anthropomorphizing.

Eagles touch beaks before one flies off.

The remaining eagle fluffed the nest a little, rolled the egg, and settled in

Parent eagle fluffing the nest.
She rolled the egg…
… and settled in.

Most of the egg-brooding is done by the female. She has 35 days to go before this chick hatches out. Bald Eagles lay between one and three eggs, so we’ll have to keep watching to see if more eggs appear.

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Eagle Cam

Many years ago, the local power company, Public Service of Colorado, placed a nest box on the smokestack of one of their power plants. They put a camera inside, and watched what happened.

What happened was that a pair of Great Horned Owls moved in and raised a family. The public got to watch. Very cool.

Fast forward several decades. PSC merged with two other power companies in 1995 to form Excel. One of the other companies also had bird cams (which is the story you read in their “Information” page.) Excel now has at least five raptor cams, three in Colorado and two in Minnesota. https://birdcam.xcelenergy.com/cams

Both Bald Eagles and Great Horned Owls begin nesting in January, if you can believe it. Right now, I’ve only seen activity in the Bald Eagle nest. https://birdcam.xcelenergy.com/cams/xcel_energy_eagle_cams/eagle_cam_two

The male, in the foreground, has a bloody beak, after eating a rabbit, the remains of which are just to the left of his head. The female is rearranging the sticks to her liking. Courtesy Excel Energy Bird Cam

I saw them mating earlier, and interestingly, in this pair, the male seems to be the larger. In raptors, usually, it is the female who is bigger.

The female continues to rearrange sticks. Courtesy Excel Energy Bird Cam.

I have two monitors on my computer and have one on the bird cam permanently. I look forward to watching the nest cams through the spring and summer. I hope you enjoy them, too!

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Library Goose

I love going to the library! You get the entire world at your fingertips — fiction, science, art, music, geese.

Yes, geese were at the library this morning. Colorado has become a wintering stop for vast numbers of Canada geese, who earn their keep by turning dead grass on lawns into organic fertilizer. But this small flock included this odd duck — er — goose.

The bird in the center doesn’t have a white “chin strap” as the Canada Geese do. And it has orange feet. It’s bill is blunter, and it doesn’t look as heavy as the other birds.

I think the bird in the center is an immature blue-morph Snow Goose. Snow Geese breed in the far north, on the Arctic coasts of North America. There are three populations of Snow Geese — western, mid-continent and eastern.

There are two color forms, or morphs of Snow Geese — white or blue. While the coastal Snow Geese populations are mostly the traditional white, the mid-continent populations has a high percentage of blue-morphs. And this is apparently an immature blue-morph.

I took these shots with my cell phone. Now that I know that at least one Snow Goose is hanging out with the Canada Geese at the library, I need to take my camera with me when I go, to get some better photographs of them.

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Red-Tailed Hawk

As I pulled into my driveway this afternoon, I spotted a red-tailed hawk about 20 feet up in a cottonwood across the street.

I think this bird is a female, based on her size — female raptors are bigger than males. And she is big.

You can see how big this bird is when you realize that she is about 20 feet up in a cottonwood.

I’ve seen her several times in the neighborhood, usually being mobbed by the resident crows, ravens and magpies.

Which brings up the question — why is she in a suburban neighborhood? I mean, we are on the very western edge of the Denver metro area, with the mountains about half a mile away — she might cruise in once in a while to see what she could take, but the open foothills are better habitat for her. And we have a healthy resident population of woodland raptors like Coopers and sharp-shinned hawks that already patrol this territory.

Local Red-tailed hawk watching a boy walking home from school. She looks like she’s judging her chances, but non-nesting raptors don’t attack people — we’re too big to eat. Rabbits, prairie dogs, medium-sized birds are her usual prey.

She gave me no answers. I’ll just have to watch her like a hawk this winter, and see what happens.

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Zoe, the Pet Therapy Dog

After trainingĀ  (Zoe the Corgi’s First Day of Pet Therapy) and an initial evaluation, Zoe and I went to our final Pet Therapy evaluation today. Considering that Zoe is my third dog in the program (Dog as God’s Messenger), I was surprisingly nervous. I worried that I might forget something or that rules might have changed while I wasn’t looking.

Things started off well. We met Lyn, our evaluator, at hospice, and proceeded to visit the staff. We always try to see all the staff we can at hospice. It takes a special person to work there, and they deserve all the warm fuzzies we can give them. Zoe was her charming self, her little stub of a tail wagging furiously as she dashed over to see her next new best friend.

Once all the hospice staff had been suitably loved, we walked down the hall to see patients and family. As we approached our first room, we were surprisedĀ  by a little Scottie who came charging out of the room, barking to mark it’s territory. Zoe, startled and challenged, barked back.

I groaned inside as red-alert alarms went off in my brain. Pet Therapy dogs are not supposed to bark in the hospital. I corrected Zoe by giving her the “leave it” and “quiet” commands, but I also waited for Lyn to show us the door.

But Lyn just shrugged. While patients can bring pets into hospice, they are supposed to abide by the same rules as pet therapy dogs, and not bark in the building. This dog had startled Zoe, and barked a challenge. Zoe responded, but quieted almost instantly. No harm, no foul. Whew!

The rest of the visit went fine. We shared the love with patients and visitors. I didn’t make any mistakes. Lyn’s biggest concern was that Zoe pulled at the end of her leash in her eagerness to get to people. Since she weighs 22 pounds, it wasn’t as if she was going to pull loose and go tearing down the hall. With age and experience, and me gently reminding her, we agreed that she’ll settle down and save her energy for wagging her tail stub.

So it’s official: Zoe has earned her purple scarf, and is now a Pet Therapy dog.

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Zoe the Corgi’s First Day of Pet Therapy

Zoe turned two yesterday, and so we were able to visit the hospital as a pet therapy team for the first time today.

Zoes First day of Pet Therapy 2_edited-2

Don’t you just love the little corgi tongue sticking out?

I’m often asked what it takes for a dog to be a pet therapy dog. Requirements vary from program to program, but here’s the minimum for the pet therapy program at Lutheran Medical Center:

The dog has to be friendly to every person it meets.

It absolutely cannot growl, snarl or snap. If it does for any reason, it’s out.

It has to be well behaved — no jumping, lunging, or bark. Basic obedience is nice — sit, stay, settle, down — but not mandatory, as long as the owner has control of the dog at all times.

It can’t lick or give “kisses”. I know. I love them, too, but mouths are germy places, and that’s bad for people who are sick already. More surprising, it’s not dog hair that people are allergic to, it is dog saliva. It’s just that the hair has saliva on it. So, no licking.

It must be able to take a treat gently.

It must pass a fecal screening to make sure it is free of parasites.

And finally, the one Zoe and I have been waiting for, the dog must be two years old.

When Zoe first came to us (A little corgi dropped in and wanted to stay.), she was a little skittish around men and other tall people. Hats and umbrellas freaked her out, too. I can’t blame her for being nervous — she’d had a lot of changes in her short life.

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Just a little worried…

But I could sense even then that she would be a great pet therapy dog if we could get her used to new things. So we started encouraging her to “say hello” to every person she came across. Treats may have been involved.

Zoe & Tegan_188-1.jpg

We worked on “no kisses” after Zoe got over being shy.

The end result was visiting the hospital, with all it’s strange sights, sounds and smells, and greeting new people, some of whom who wear floppy gowns — and loving it. I was ready to leave before Zoe was.

Zoe's first Pet Therapy day_edited-1

Why are we stopping?

Next up — being evaluated by other pet therapy program people to make sure I’m not biased or missing something. I don’t think she has any serious problems, but we’ll see…

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Pet Therapy at Fall Festival

Lutheran Medical Center held its first ever Fall Festival on Saturday. It was a ton of fun, as different groups from the hospital dressed for Halloween while holding a health fair. They asked Pet Therapy to lead the way with a Pet Therapy Parade. If it means they get to greet people, the dogs are always happy to oblige!

Zoe in her tutu and hat

Zoe is ready to show off her costume. She picked it out herself!

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Zoe greets a fan.

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Pet Therapy dogs come in all sizes.

 

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This greyhound has been in the Pet Therapy program for 8 years.

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It was another intense day of greeting her new friends. Zoe is tired, but content.

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Tour de Corgi

My daughter and I went to the 4th Annual Tour de Corgi festival in Fort Collins on Saturday. Tour de Corgi started a few years ago as a corgi meet and greet, and exploded into a major fundraiser for 4 Paws Pet Pantry, Low Riders of the West, and the Wyoming Dachshund and Corgi Rescue.

My photos don’t really do it justice, but I was having too much fun to take pictures. There were corgis everywhere. It was like seeing double.

Zoe meets her twin.

Zoe, center, meets her twin. Tegan is to the left.

Or triple.

Tour de corgi (3)

Zoe greets another new corgi friend.

Or hundred-iple.

Tour de Corgi Crowd

Hundreds of corgis and even more people met at Fort Collins’ Civic Center Park for a costume contest and corgi parade.

There were pounds of hounds and even more people.

Tour de corgi (4)_edited-1

Zoe was so proud to be surrounded by her people — er — pupple. Or something.

Zoe Amy Tegan Tour de Corgi

We brought Tegan along as a corgi groupie. She’s a mutt, but she might have a little corgi in her?

Tour de corgi (5)_edited-1.jpg

Zoe was a pooped pup by the time we left. She collapsed in the center of the car.

Zoe totally relaxed

Tired but happy, Zoe had a well earned nap when we got home.

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