Where have all the birds gone?


Look at this picture. Look at it closely. Count the nuImagember of birds in it. How many did you find?

If you counted zero, nada, zilch, you are not alone. Since before Thanksgiving, I have seen very few birds at our feeders.

In an email to Hugh Kingery, of the Audubon Society of Greater Denver, said that several people all along the Front Range have commented on the lack of birds at their feeders. He feels that there are fewer coniferous (spruce, pine and fir) tree cones for the seed eaters to feed on, but others say that their berry bushes are full of berries, with no birds eating them.

So far, nobody has any speculation on where the birds went, either.

About coloradogeography

Amy Law is a second-generation Coloradoan with a passion for her native state. This translated into a Master’s degree in Natural Resources from Colorado State University, and continues as a lifelong fascination with how people and nature interact. From family vacations in the station wagon to travel for work, she's covered the state, and everywhere she goes, she finds new things to see and ideas to explore.
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7 Responses to Where have all the birds gone?

  1. so do you think we should be freaked out …like all the speculation around the bee thing?

  2. In this case, the birds that are missing are house sparrows, house finches, Northern flickers — birds that are really adapted to suburban living. I don’t think it is a die-off like with the bees. I think that some small-to-us change made living someplace else better this winter. This is happening in the northeast of the US and southeast of Canada this year, where they are seeing snowy owls coming down from the arctic because the lemming population there has crashed. I’m pretty sure that our birds will be back. It’s just so lonely looking in the backyard until they do.

    • The other day I saw a flicker and thought to myself that it was the first time I had seen one in a very long time. But we live away from the suburbs in a pretty remote area. I’d love to hear more about this.

      • I want to know more, too. Right now, it is just people noticing that they aren’t seeing birds. It will take a while for the data to come in, but as I get more information, I’ll be posting it.

  3. Andrew says:

    Could the torrential rains we had in September have anything to do with it?

    • I think that is a very good question. All that water could have ruined food sources that they were counting on. I think I’ll try to see when people first noticed that the birds were not around.
      Amy

  4. Pingback: Birds have just moved a bit | Colorado Geography In Depth and At Altitude

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