Ten days of growth…

April 4, 2019

Mama eagle shades the chicks. At this point, they are 9 days old.

April 4, 2019

Up until this day, I hadn’t seen them out of the central depression, where the failed egg remains. But once they started exploring, they rambled all over.

April 5, 2019

I’m a little annoyed, because Mama eagle is in the way of a nice shot of the little ones. There were two cameras on the nest, but the bomb cyclone took out one of them, so I can’t switch for a better view.

April 6, 2019

Oh! I get it now! Mom providing shade for the chicks while they sleep. Now that I understand what she’s doing, I see that she actually shades them a lot.

You can see the remains of a fish at her feet. The failed egg is still in the nest, too.

April 9, 2019

She spends a lot of time feeding them.

April 11, 2019

The last couple of days, the male has been covering the chicks up with nest material. I have no idea why.

April 11, 2019

The male has covered the chicks up. The female finally took nesting material out of his beak and put it back where he had picked it up. Hah! I could practically hear her saying “Will you just stop?”

April 11, 2019

Not only have the chicks grown, they are beginning to lose their downy feathers, and their beaks and talons are turning from black to grey.

April 11, 2019

Above: The female has already fed the right hand chick the first half of the fish in her beak. A previous fish is in the left foreground.

I always thought that it was kinda a free-for-all at feeding time for birds — the chicks opened their beaks as wide as they could and the adult dropped food into the biggest mouth. That hasn’t been the case with the eagles — one chick is fed until it is full, then the other is fed. This could be a problem in lean years, but the male has kept the nest full of fish this year.

April 11, 2019

It took her 8 minutes to feed the second half of the fish to the left chick. By the time she finished, all that remains of the fish are under her talons — not much. She feeds them several times a day, not always as much, but a lot.

As of April 12, 2019, the chicks are 17 days old.

Bald Eagle Egg #3, Day 1

The Fort St. Vrain Bald Eagles have been busy. They’ve added more sticks to their nest…

Male brings another stick to the nest — this seems to be an ongoing remodeling project, kinda like our bathroom renovation.

… they are eating well…

… and as of this morning, they’ve laid a third egg.

If I’ve counted correctly, we should start seeing eaglets around March 20.

Eagle Cam

Many years ago, the local power company, Public Service of Colorado, placed a nest box on the smokestack of one of their power plants. They put a camera inside, and watched what happened.

What happened was that a pair of Great Horned Owls moved in and raised a family. The public got to watch. Very cool.

Fast forward several decades. PSC merged with two other power companies in 1995 to form Excel. One of the other companies also had bird cams (which is the story you read in their “Information” page.) Excel now has at least five raptor cams, three in Colorado and two in Minnesota. https://birdcam.xcelenergy.com/cams

Both Bald Eagles and Great Horned Owls begin nesting in January, if you can believe it. Right now, I’ve only seen activity in the Bald Eagle nest. https://birdcam.xcelenergy.com/cams/xcel_energy_eagle_cams/eagle_cam_two

The male, in the foreground, has a bloody beak, after eating a rabbit, the remains of which are just to the left of his head. The female is rearranging the sticks to her liking. Courtesy Excel Energy Bird Cam

I saw them mating earlier, and interestingly, in this pair, the male seems to be the larger. In raptors, usually, it is the female who is bigger.

The female continues to rearrange sticks. Courtesy Excel Energy Bird Cam.

I have two monitors on my computer and have one on the bird cam permanently. I look forward to watching the nest cams through the spring and summer. I hope you enjoy them, too!