And they’re off!

It’s been almost a month since I last posted about the eagle chicks. A lot’s happened in that time.

May 20, 2019 One eagle has a dead rabbit pinned beneath it’s talon.

Before they can live independently, the chicks need to learn how to eat on their own. The parents have brought the chicks a rabbit to eat, but then they left. The chicks have to figure out how to get into the carcass on their own.

May 20, 2019 Eagle chick tugging on rabbit carcass

With those razor-sharp beaks, you wouldn’t think that would be a problem, but it seems to have stymied them here.

May 20, 2019
Eagle chick looking at the remains of the rabbit carcass.

They must have figured it out, because when I checked in a couple of hours later, the rabbit was pretty much eaten.

And so it went…they practiced flying, and hopping and tearing into prey…

May 25, 2109 Eagle chick tugs on sibling’s tail feathers.

…with an occasional tug on a sibling’s tail…

June 3, 2019 Adult bald eagle visits empty nest.

…until one day, there were no chicks in the nest.†

The chicks still come back to the nest, but I assume that it is only habit that brings them back. Because the cameras only point into the nest, we can’t follow them as they master flying, hunting and living their lives. But we can know that, from eggs to now (https://amylaw.blog/2019/03/26/first-bald-eagle-chick-at-fort-st-vrain-nest/), they have had a good start in life.

And we wish them well.

Prepping for Take-off

May 2, 2019

The day after I last posted, I noticed new behaviors with the Bald Eagle chicks — they began stretching and flapping their wings…

May 8, 2019

…and they began feeding themselves — just a little at first, but it’s a milestone.

As with all new skills, wing-flapping takes a lot of practice, and the willingness to fail. They need to practice until they get it right. Once they try to fly, they have to get the basics right the first time.

May 12, 2019

One of the Eagle chicks spent a fair amount of time staring into the camera this day. I suspect that the lens caught the light and that caught the attention of the chick.

May 14, 2019

More wing-stretching. Only one chick stretches at a time, often in sessions of fifteen minutes or more at a time. They have also moved closer to the edge of the nest.

May 14, 2019

A new twist to the wing stretching — hopping as they flap.

One month old

April 12, 2019.

This is one of the few times I have seen both the chicks go after the same morsel of food.

Notice that the unhatched egg is no longer visible. I don’t know if they carried off, or if it just finally got buried in nest material.

April 18, 2019

One of the things that has really surprised me has been the constant remodeling of the nest. Here the male (I think) has brought back a new branch. He hasn’t trimmed it yet, so it obscures the rear chick.

April 18, 2019

The adult bird really has no idea how big this branch is, and just smacked the chick in the foreground with it.

April 18, 2019

The chicks are beginning to stretch their wings.

April 24, 2019

As the chicks grow, they are becoming more active, and more curious. The chick in the background has been wrestling with the piece of wood, while the one in the foreground seems to be checking out the camera. Notice that their juvenile feathers are coming in.

April 26, 2019

It was a windy day in Platteville — the nest was rocking back and forth a fair amount. This chick very deliberately stood up, spread it’s feet, and started stretching it’s wings, evidently enjoying the feel of the wind going over them.

The eagle chicks are now a month old.

Ten days of growth…

April 4, 2019

Mama eagle shades the chicks. At this point, they are 9 days old.

April 4, 2019

Up until this day, I hadn’t seen them out of the central depression, where the failed egg remains. But once they started exploring, they rambled all over.

April 5, 2019

I’m a little annoyed, because Mama eagle is in the way of a nice shot of the little ones. There were two cameras on the nest, but the bomb cyclone took out one of them, so I can’t switch for a better view.

April 6, 2019

Oh! I get it now! Mom providing shade for the chicks while they sleep. Now that I understand what she’s doing, I see that she actually shades them a lot.

You can see the remains of a fish at her feet. The failed egg is still in the nest, too.

April 9, 2019

She spends a lot of time feeding them.

April 11, 2019

The last couple of days, the male has been covering the chicks up with nest material. I have no idea why.

April 11, 2019

The male has covered the chicks up. The female finally took nesting material out of his beak and put it back where he had picked it up. Hah! I could practically hear her saying “Will you just stop?”

April 11, 2019

Not only have the chicks grown, they are beginning to lose their downy feathers, and their beaks and talons are turning from black to grey.

April 11, 2019

Above: The female has already fed the right hand chick the first half of the fish in her beak. A previous fish is in the left foreground.

I always thought that it was kinda a free-for-all at feeding time for birds — the chicks opened their beaks as wide as they could and the adult dropped food into the biggest mouth. That hasn’t been the case with the eagles — one chick is fed until it is full, then the other is fed. This could be a problem in lean years, but the male has kept the nest full of fish this year.

April 11, 2019

It took her 8 minutes to feed the second half of the fish to the left chick. By the time she finished, all that remains of the fish are under her talons — not much. She feeds them several times a day, not always as much, but a lot.

As of April 12, 2019, the chicks are 17 days old.

Two out of Three

It’s been ten days or so since the first two eagle chicks have hatched. They have grown and become much more active.

The two eagle chicks are much more active than when they hatched ten days ago. They have moved away from the central part of the nest.

The third egg, though, is probably not going to hatch. Today, the mother eagle stopped brooding the egg entirely.

Like babies everywhere, after eating, it’s nap time.

Even if the last egg did hatch, the chicks get fed on the basis of who has their mouth open the biggest. The two chicks in the nest now would out compete the late comer, and it would starve.


First Bald Eagle Chick at Fort St. Vrain Nest!

The first bald eagle chick at the Fort St. Vrain nest has just hatched! In the first screen shots I took this morning, the eagles hadn’t even moved the egg shell out from under the adult!

Eaglet #1 is presented to the world.

According to the Excel website, the chick made it’s way into the world about 10:00 last night.

The eaglet is still a little wobbly on it’s legs, and has momentarily dropped out of sight.

Father cleaning up the nest.

Good comparison of father (left) with mother (right). In an earlier post, I said I thought the male was bigger, but the Excel Power biologist says it is the female (as is normally the case).

Mother and chick (and father) are all doing fine.

Bald Eagles in Wild Storm

With Winter Storm Ulmer crashing in, the bald eagles at their Fort St. Vrain nest (https://amylaw.blog/2019/02/10/eagle-cam/)have had a hard day today.

It started off with driving sleet that soaked our birds.

Both of them huddled together for about half an our — the longest I’ve seen both birds in the nest during the day.

But by 10:00 am, they were soaked.

1:03 pm Then the snow began to build up.

1:32 pm What the still photos don’t really show is how much the wind was howling, and the nest platform shaking. Denver International Airport, ten miles away from the nest, recorded 80 mile an hour gusts — hurricane force winds!

1:49 pm We kept losing power and internet, so I would go for a time without seeing the bird on the nest. When internet came back up, she’d still be there, patiently keeping her eggs warm and dry with her body.

2:11 pm She’d shake her head once in a while, but mostly she did her job — she sat on her eggs, and let the snow pile up.

4:31 pm Both eagles were back on the nest.

To all those who had to be out in this miserable storm — to keep the power on, to keep the internet up, to keep us safe, and to keep eggs warm — thank you.

Bald Eagle Egg #3, Day 1

The Fort St. Vrain Bald Eagles have been busy. They’ve added more sticks to their nest…

Male brings another stick to the nest — this seems to be an ongoing remodeling project, kinda like our bathroom renovation.

… they are eating well…

… and as of this morning, they’ve laid a third egg.

If I’ve counted correctly, we should start seeing eaglets around March 20.